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English

Curriculum vision

Intent

Curriculum vision / Intent: The English curriculum offers an ambitious literacy programme in recognition that high levels of literacy gives greater access to learning across all subject areas, as well as equipping our students for life beyond the classroom. Our department embeds the importance of Douay as a Reading School through dedicated curriculum time to regular reading of a wide variety of texts. We place oracy as an integral part of our English classroom, as we understand the importance of spoken language skills for university, the workplace and wider life. Students are given the safe space to discuss literature and wider themes, where they grow in confidence to share and express their opinions. Our focus in Year 7 is to successfully transition all of our students from primary for them to access the curriculum and to introduce the skills that they will continue to develop through their academic career at Douay up to their GCSEs and beyond. Students begin their AQA GCSE Language and Literature course in Year 9, after two years of foundations in reading, writing and speaking skills. Throughout their GCSE studies, we interleave the skills and texts learned in order to best prepare students to achieve their potential in their final exams. There is a balance of English Language and Literature Skills, with schemes of work evaluated and updated to meet the particular needs of the students.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

  Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
            

Year 7

            
Reading for Pleasure and ‘A Christmas Carol’

We begin transitioning primary students through the Summer Reading text, which is a welcoming introduction to Reading for Pleasure. This leads to creative and interactive lessons decoding new vocabulary. For the remainder of the Autumn Term, the students read and are introduced to analysing the language in Charles Dickens ‘A Christmas Carol’.

            

 

            
Creative Writing and Poetry

Students move on to producing their own adventure story through the study of genre conventions and what makes a story. The definition of adventure will be discussed and students will develop their use of language techniques, sentence starters and narrative viewpoint to create their own story.

Students will consider culture and how poets express feelings of belonging through their poetry. The oracy focus will enable the students to gain confidence in public speaking as they create and present their own poem.      

 

            

 

            

Shakespeare

Students are introduced to the works of Shakespeare and The Globe Theatre. We look at extracts from four plays and building on their language analysis skills, from the first two terms, the students analyse a key scene from ‘Romeo and Juliet’. Oracy is embedded through considering the performance of the play and students will have the opportunity to act out scenes.      

 

            

 

            

 

            
            

Year 8 

            

 

            
Monsters and Mysteries and ‘The Tempest’
We begin the transition into Year 8 through the Summer Reading text and the reinforcement of the value of Reading for Pleasure. This leads into the study of a selection of extracts from Gothic Literature and the introduction of the skills required for English Language Paper 1. Building on the skills of analysis and their introduction to Shakespeare in Year 7, students study a full play ‘The Tempest’ where they increase their confidence of discussing and writing about language.  Both Schemes of Work overlap with the social and historical context for the study of their Literature GCSE texts.

 

            

People Poetry and Comparing Non-Fiction Texts

The poetry analysis skills from Year 7 are developed in Year 8 through the study of poetry revealing the feelings of the poet towards a family member.  Two poems are compared to introduce the students to the skills required for their GCSEs.

To develop the comparison skills required, we then look at Language Paper 2 and comparing non-fiction texts. Students study a selection of extracts from autobiographies, letters, article and travel writing and begin to consider how a writer can reveal their viewpoint and perspective through their choice of language and persuasive techniques. Our aim for this term is to give the students a good foundation in comparing, comparative terms and structuring a comparison essay, key skills required for both Literature and Language GCSE.    

 

            

 

            

‘Animal Farm’

Students study a modern text that is able to be enjoyed and accessed by all students, both as a “fairy story” but also as an allegory. We build on the study of persuasive techniques from last term and students consider how an author can incorporate these literary devices in fiction texts. Oracy is embedded throughout the SoW with discussion focused on the opinion of characters and writing their own persuasive speeches, which they will have the opportunity to share with the class. Students are also developing their language analysis skills through the writing of extended analytical paragraphs. All of these skills are required for both their Literature and Language GCSE.
            
            

Year 9

            

 

            

Unseen Poetry

Language Paper 2 preparation –I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings

Students will explore different styles of poetry and use strategies to effectively analyse form, structure and language.

Students will explore a canonical piece of modern fiction and discuss important 21st century issues such as race, gender and mental illness. Students will be able to respond to long-form essay questions and use quotes effectively.

 

            

Writing and Speaking Persuasively – Speaking and Listening

Paper one preparation using 19th century texts

Students will learn effective communicational and presentational skills. Students will be able to express their ideas in a sophisticated and effective way, considering ways in which they can persuade others to adopt their point of view.

Students will become familiar with the language of 19th century fiction: a significant component of their English Literature GCSE. Students will also practice skills such as thinking deeply about language and structural technique, considering how authors use words to make their audience feel a certain way.
            

Shakespeare Project: Macbeth

Students will become well acquainted with their set text for GCSE and will begin to unpick the meanings and social comments in this play. Students will learn how to respond to exam style assessments and formulate answers which hit every assessment objective.

 

            
            

Year 10

            

 

            

Jekyll and Hyde and Paper 1 Language Section B

Students will build on skills developed throughout Key Stage 3 and learn how to respond to exam style assessments. They will explore the writer’s intentions and use of methods. Contextual factors will be examined and how this can have impact on meaning. They will prepare for Section B of the Language Paper by learning to write creatively, using a range of linguistic devices for impact, powerful vocabulary and structural devices to add meaning.

 

Language Paper 2: Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives: Section A

Students will study a wide range of non-fiction texts to compare the writers’ viewpoints. The aim of this unit is to develop students’ insights into how writers have particular viewpoints and perspectives on issues or themes that are important to the way we think and live our lives. It will encourage students to demonstrate their skills by reading two linked sources from different time periods and genres in order to consider how each presents a perspective or viewpoint to influence the reader.

Literature Paper 2 Section C Power and Conflict and the Unseen poetry

Students will study one cluster of poems taken from the AQA poetry anthology, Poems Past and Present. There is a choice of two clusters, each containing 15 poems. The poems in each cluster are thematically linked and were written between 1789 and the present day. They will explore the impact of contextual factors as well as close examination of the writers’ use of methods and exam style questions.

 

            

Year 11

            

 

            

Literature Paper 2 An Inspector Calls and Section B Language Paper 2.

Students continue to build on skills developed throughout the course. They will study the play ‘An Inspector Calls.’ The writer’s intentions, contextual factors and methods used by the writer will be explored in detail. They will develop their writing by producing a written text to a specified audience, purpose and form in which they give their own perspective on the theme that has been introduced to them in section A.

 

Language Paper 1 and 2 Section A and B

This unit will develop and consolidate their skills and learning throughout the course. They will have opportunities to answer exam style questions and respond to a range of diverse and relevant texts. They will identify viewpoints, explore the writer’s use of methods and write for a variety of different purposes.

 

Literature Paper 1 Revision Macbeth and Jekyll and Hyde

Students will build on previous learning of Macbeth and Jekyll and Hyde. They will explore the impact contextual factors can have on meaning and read critically: with insight and engagement.

 

Year 12 

Literary Traditions Across Time Unseen Poetry Revisit literary tradition (AO4) eg: Romanticism and Gothic

Othello-context, plot, characters, themes Revisit literary traditions (AO4) especially Renaissance

The Great Gatsby-context, plot, characters, themes Revisit literary traditions (AO4) especially Modernism

Revisit Othello context, plot, characters, themes

Revisit literary traditions- Renaissance literature (Othello)

Pre 1900 Love Through the Ages Poetry

Revisit The Great Gatsby and make links between this prose text and Love Through the Ages poetry

Revisit literary traditions- Modernism (The Great Gatsby), Romanticism, Neo Classical and Victorian (Love Through the Ages) and Renaissance literature (Love Through the Ages)

Revisit Comparison skills

Revisit The Great Gatsby and Love Through the Ages and literary traditions found in these texts (AO4)

Revisit Othello-Key themes, characterisation, plot, Literary tradition

Revisit Literary Criticism (feminism, psychoanalytical, Marxism)- link to all the core texts (The Great Gatsby, Pre 1900 Anthology, Othello) and also to readings of Unseen Prose and Unseen Poetry

Unseen Prose: Revisit Modernism and Post Modernism literary traditions

Year 13 

Revisit The Great Gatsby, Love Through the Ages, Othello key themes, characterisation, links to literary tradition, critical interpretations

The Color Purple

letters 1-51 context, plot, characters, themes Make links with literary criticism

First NEA draft due Half term Second draft due in at Christmas

Feminine Gospels

Revisit The Color Purple and make links to Feminine Gospels Make links with literary criticism

A Streetcar Named Desire

- context, plot, characters, themes Make links with literary criticism regarding A Streetcar Named Desire, Feminine Gospels, A Color Purple Revisit and interleaving: Post Modernism literary traditions (Unseen Prose, The Color Purple, Feminism Gospels, A Streetcar Named Desire)

Revisit The Great Gatsby, Love Through the Ages, Othello

key themes, characterisation, links to literary tradition, critical interpretations

Revisit A Streetcar Named Desire

Context, plot, characters, themes Literary heritage Post Modernism

The Color Purple

letters 52-90 context, plot, characters, themes make links with Feminine Gospels

Revisit The Color Purple letter 1-51 and make links to more Feminine Gospels poems

Feminine Gospels

Revisit earlier Feminine Gospels poems and make links to The Color Purple letters 52-90

Revisit Unseen Prose Revisit Post Modernism literary traditions (Interleave with The Color Purple, Feminism Gospels, A Streetcar Named Desire)

Revisit The Great Gatsby, Love Through the Ages, Othello

key themes, characterisation, links to literary tradition Revisit Unseen Poetry NEA- finalisation of drafts Finalisation of NEA

 

Revision of all texts and exam sections:

Othello, Unseen Poetry, The Great Gatsby and Love Through the Ages comparison

A Streetcar Named Desire, Unseen Prose, The Color Purple and Feminine Gospels comparison Recapping of Literary Criticism (feminism, psychoanalytical, Marxism)- link to all the core texts (The Great Gatsby, Pre 1900 Anthology, Othello, Feminine Gospels, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Color Purple) and also to readings of Unseen Prose and Unseen Poetry

Revisit literary traditions especially Renaissance (Othello, Pre 1900 Anthology), Modernism (The Great Gatsby, Pre 1900 Anthology) and Post Modernism (The Color Purple, Feminine Gospels, A Streetcar Named Desire), Victorian, Neo Classical (Pre 1900 Anthology)

 

 

Impact

The impact of our ambitious English Curriculum is to support all students from primary through to KS3, GCSE, A Level and beyond. We appreciate that the skills students learn in English prepare them for both their exams and their wider life experiences (and beyond English to all other areas of the curriculum) which is why we place such a focus on literacy and oracy. The texts that we study are accessible to all students and allow for stretch and challenge for our academically ambitious students. We seek to encourage critical thinking and debate and how the texts and themes we study are relevant to modern day. We offer an engaging curriculum that prepares our students to achieve their potential whilst also recognising the vital building blocks needed to support and develop a variety of learners.